Find events by Location, Date.

19.02.18 10

  • Christopher Lambert Exhibition

    Hartlepool Art Gallery

    20.01.18 — 17.03.18

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    What do we define as home? Is it where you were born, somewhere you found, or is it just a feeling that tells you when you’re there. This piece explores the relationship of what it means to call a place home, our traditions, values, and what leads us to stay or move away.

  • Andrew Watt – The Art of Colour and Detail

    Hartlepool Art Gallery

    19.01.18 — 17.03.18

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    The artist loves working on large scale, with acrylic paint, enamel paint and ink which gives his art depth and creates free flowing intricate detail. Watts work is very colourful, energetic and inspired by his love of Abstract Expressionism. He notes he has always been captivated by the abstract detail from artist Turner, Constable, Picasso, Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock and Willem de kooning.

  • Andrew Watt ‘The Art of Colour & Detail’

    Hartlepool Art Gallery

    20.01.18 — 17.03.18

    The artist loves working on large scale, with acrylic paint, enamel paint and ink which gives his art depth and creates free flowing intricate detail. Watts work is very colourful, energetic and inspired by his love of Abstract Expressionism. He notes he has always been captivated by the abstract detail from artist Turner, Constable, Picasso, Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, Willem de kooning, and mo

  • The Vagaries and Misconceptions of the Modern Man

    Vane

    19.01.18 — 24.02.18

    Recent sculptural works by Ralph Darbyshire, Richard Hollinshead and Kenneth Ross exploring the fallibilities in seemingly certain masculine positions. Figurative in the broadest sense, these works collectively engage with difficult material, whether explicit or operating as a disquieting undercurrent; and whether concerned with political unrest, sexuality, violence or intergenerational dispute.

  • In Conversation with Serena Korda

    BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art

    10.02.18 — 14.04.18

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    BALTIC welcomes you to a series of In Conversation events with artist Serena Korda and invited guests to explore some of the ideas that have informed her practice. These events will take place through February 2018 to April 2018.

  • Serena Korda: Missing Time

    BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art

    09.02.18 — 28.05.18

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    Serena Korda works across performance, sound and sculpture reconsidering aspects of communion and tradition in our lives. Korda is the 2016-17 Norma Lipman & BALTIC Fellow in Ceramic Sculpture at Newcastle University, a two-year residency that culminates in this exhibition.

  • Jasmina Cibic: THIS MACHINE BUILDS NATIONS

    BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art

    09.02.18 — 28.05.18

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    Bringing together film, sculpture, performance and installation into multi-layered projects, the core themes of Jasmina Cibic’s practice explore how art, architecture and political rhetoric are deployed and instrumentalised in the name of the nation.

  • Sofia Stevi: turning forty winks into a decade

    BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art

    15.12.17 — 22.04.18

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    Sofia Stevi makes paintings, sculpture and works on paper. Drawing inspiration from literature, philosophy and the everyday, her works bring together a wide range of references, from the writings of Victorian poet Christina Rossetti, to found images on Instagram.

  • Susan Philipsz: A Single Voice

    BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art

    20.10.17 — 04.03.18

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    Over the course of two decades, Turner Prize-winning artist Susan Philipsz has experimented with the relationship between sound and architecture. Often choosing the human voice as her primary medium, Philipsz is especially interested in the emotive and psychological properties of sound and how it can alter individual consciousness.

  • Streatlam Castle: Rediscover The Home Of John And Joséphine Bowes

    The Bowes Museum

    25.11.17 — 11.03.18

    On 29 March 1959 the remains of Streatlam Castle vanished in a series of huge explosions. That exercise completed, only a pile of rubble remained to tell of the house and castle that had stood on the site for over 600 years, 500 of those in the ownership of the Bowes family. And yet... not every trace had been erased.